Innovating and disrupting, all in a day’s work

Recently I had the pleasure of speaking at the HighEdWeb New England regional conference. What a great bunch of people! I really enjoyed the energy and positivity of the sessions and the side conversations. This is a group undaunted by the challenge of bring order, quality, and new ideas to the fairly conservative yet chaotic medium of college and university websites.

Bringing order to chaos has been my main focus for the last five or so years as a web strategist, first at Dartmouth College and more recently at Harvard University. I spoke about my work on the Harvard Web Publishing Initiative at HighEdWebNE, and it was a great opportunity for me to get my head around some of the more innovative aspects of the project, and some of the challenges.

I started on HWPI in June of last year, as Web Strategy Project Lead. Personally, I love a challenge, and I can’t think of many things more challenging than setting up a centralized governance model, suite of services, and software platform for web publishing in an environment as large and decentralized as Harvard University. The project is ambitious and forward-looking, with strong backing from institutional leadership.

Our approach to HWPI has been enterprising on many fronts:

  • Learning by doing. Rather than engage in an extended discovery phase to learn the requirements for the project, we started with a pilot phase. We redesigned the websites of 10 academic and administrative departments, identifying the requirements for the platform and best practices for service delivery, and setting standards for user experience and design.
  • Guided by strategy. To avoid “lift and drop” redesigns we started each project with a project charter, asking departments to step back and define goals, target audience, and success metrics. We also identified and assigned ongoing departmental resources, particularly for content.
  • Focus on user experience. A consistent user interface improves user experience because visitors can learn the interface once, and then apply what they know to other Harvard sites. We designed common navigation and wayfinding systems for academic and administrative departments.
  • Commitment to quality. HWPI is about quality, and not just on the surface. We hired a digital content strategist to help departments craft their content to best accomplish their goals.
  • Software for higher ed. HWPI is using OpenScholar, a Harvard built Drupal-based open source software platform designed to help faculty communicate about scholarly endeavors. With origins in higher education and developers on the HWPI team, OpenScholar is expanding to include functionality needed for university communications.
  • Responsive and accessible. Early on we realized that a great visual design that works well in different contexts and devices would be an enticement to use the platform. We partnered with Happy Cog to develop accessible and responsive templates for the platform.

By the end of March we were through the pilot phase, successfully launching the 10 pilot sites. But it wasn’t always an easy process, for the team or the clients.

One of my lessons learned about our approach inspired the topic for my HighEdWebNE presentation: that innovative ideas need an innovation process.

An accidental innovator

When I started work on HWPI I thought it was interesting and challenging, but innovative? Not really. I had been working many years at Dartmouth on a similar service and platform. I expected this project to be much the same, only bigger!

As time passed I realized the project was not only innovative but also disruptive because it asks people to change their values. Rather than valuing customization it asks customers to value other factors, like a shared platform with central support, a common look-and-feel, structured content, and opportunities for content aggregation and sharing. I wish I had recognized the disruptive nature of the project earlier because I would have sought ways to adapt our process.

In my HighEdWebNE presentation I shared several books that are important for people involved in innovation projects: The Innovator’s Dilemma, to help recognize a disruptive innovation project, Diffusion of Innovations, to learn how to get innovations adopted, and Change by Design, for a “design thinking” methodology to support innovation projects.

Innovation and disruption may seem all in a day’s work for people working in technology. We don’t generally wake up in the morning and think, “Well, off to innovate!” But the customers we rely on—to adopt and enjoy the fruits of our labors—have a very different perspective. To them, we are asking a lot. We are asking them to change their values.

If you find yourself working on a product that your customers think of as new, first of all, recognize the project as a disruptive innovation. Then, form a small team to work exclusively on the project, surround the team with customers who want and value the features and capabilities of the product, and use an iterative approach of brainstorming, designing, and prototyping to produce a successful outcome.

Presentations slides from Slideshare

Slides from Innovative Ideas Need An Innovation Process, posted by highedwebne on Slideshare:

The Future of Web Accessibility: A Multi-Voice Choir

Back in May of 2011 I wrote an article about a new book project, Universal Design for Web Accessibility. Since then my co-author, Whitney Quesenbery, and I have been plugging away, stealing writing time in between moves, job changes, elections, violent weather, and the many other disruptions that come with living a full life. Continue reading “The Future of Web Accessibility: A Multi-Voice Choir”

Design and Constraints, Ease and Comfort

Photo of Eames Molded Plywood Chair
Eames Molded Plywood Chair, Courtesy of Herman Miller

I’m reading Graham Pullin’s book, Design Meets Disability. He starts out with a quote from Charles Eames: “design depends largely on constraints.” Charles and Ray Eames designed, among other things, the iconic molded plywood chairs manufactured by Herman Miller.Continue reading “Design and Constraints, Ease and Comfort”

Putting Lipstick on a Pig

Closeup photo of a pig, Courtsey of Brent Moore, Flickr.com
Courtesy of Brent Moore, Flickr.com

I recently took a trip that involved multiple hotel stays. One of the hotels reminded me of a certain type of internet experience. The hotel described itself as a luxury hotel, and indeed it had the amenities of luxury — the plush white robes waiting in the closet, the thick towels, the Gilchrist & Soames toiletries. Continue reading “Putting Lipstick on a Pig”

Web Emergency Plan

Screenshot of Dartmouth Emergency Information homepage

In light of events affecting campuses in past years, including Hurricane Katrina and the tragedy at Virginia Tech, many colleges and universities have developed protocols for managing emergency situations. The web is a key component in emergency management as a tool for notification, instruction, and communication. As a masterful worrier and contingency planner, I was only too happy to lead the project to develop a plan for using the web in an emergency.

Dartmouth’s Web Emergency Plan has several components, including:

  • An emergency banner that displays over most official College websites
  • An emergency website that displays current status information, and that would be used extensively during an emergency
  • An off-site emergency website that would be activated if Dartmouth was offline
  • An alternate homepage layout for use in the wake of an emergency

In designing these elements, we focused on ease of activation, flexibility, and lightweight design. In an emergency we knew we would need to act quickly and flexibly, as we could not predict in advance what would be needed. We would also receive a good deal of web traffic and needed to minimize demands on our infrastructure.

The campus has done a number of tests and trial runs and our protocols have executed according to plan. It’s a solid and robust plan—just what a worrier needs. While I hope its use remains purely in test mode, the Web Emergency Plan could make an enormous difference should Dartmouth ever need to put it into effect.